Review: Judas and the Black Messiah (2021)

The long-anticipated Judas and the Black Messiah only opened last month, at the [mostly virtual] Sundance Film Festival. I was busy working and, besides, high-profile movies such as this became sold out very quickly.

Review: The Little Things (2021)

For a movie that features three Oscar-winning actors -- Denzel Washington, Rami Malek, and Jared Leto -- you'd expect a movie to have some substance, or to at least be far less boring and more interesting than the exceedingly dull and unoriginal The Little Things, recently released simultaneously in limited theatres and on HBO Max. Writer-director John Lee Hancock's story not only takes place in the 1990s (which has no real effect on the story), but was supposedly written then, and doesn't appeared to have been updated. I

Review: Another Round (2020)

Mads Mikkelsen has become a sort of international treasure, having starred in both Danish-centered films and others, including as villains in Doctor Strange and the NBC series Hannibal. He was excellent in The Hunt, released several years ago and nominated for the International Feature Film Oscar -- formerly known as the Foreign Language Oscar -- so it was great to see him once again in a juicy role that allows him to flex his acting muscles in a film that takes place in his native Denmark. 

Review: Malcolm & Marie (2021)

Malcolm & Marie is the first film to be filmed, produced, and released during the pandemic. It was filmed with a very limited crew and only two actors -- new Emmy winner Zendaya and Tenet star John David washington -- and everyone followed proper COVID-19 regulations.

Review: EMMA. (2020)

When I heard that there was going to be yet another adaptation of Jane Austen's beloved Emma, I was skeptical and thought this remake was unnecessary (despite the recent success of the Little Women remake). I'd seen the '90s version starring Gwyneth Paltrow, and believed it to be just fine, while not revelatory.

Review: I’m Thinking of Ending Things (2020)

I’m thinking of ending things — and yes, it’s written this way, with no real capitalization — is a very difficult film to review. It’s one of those divisive movies that has devoted, passionate fans; those who detested it, for some reason or another; and those in-between, who feel as though it’s an expertly-made film featuring great performances that is too niche, too esoteric to be be praise-worthy.

Review: The Midnight Sky (2020)

I was looking forward to seeing another performance from George Clooney, who has been busy the last few years having (and raising) his now three-year-old twins with his humanitarian lawyer wife, Amal. I was curious to see him direct himself, and to see him to do so with a sci-fi story; The Midnight Sky is based on a book, which I haven’t read, but I can imagine it’s better than the movie.

Review: Ammonite (2020)

Ammonite was one of the most anticipated films of 2020, and managed to play in limited theatres last fall shortly before being available on demand. It’s one of the few movies not really impacted by the pandemic, but was high on my never-ending movie queue due to featuring two of my favorite actresses, Saoirse Ronan and Kate Winslet, as lovers in a period drama.

Review: The Way I See It (2020)

The Way I See It is aimed at being a bi-partisan film that could appeal to everyone on the political spectrum, from hardcore conservatives to a so-called liberal snowflake like myself. Sure, the subject of the film, former presidential photographer Pete Souza, photographed both Democratic (Obama) and Republican (Regan) presidents, but Souza is himself a staunch liberal and far more time is spent on Souza’s time with Obama than on his time with Regan.

Review: Mank (2020)

This awards season has been thrown out of whack thanks to the pandemic, which caused many high-profile films to be delay their releases and/or to be released primarily (and, in some cases, solely) on streaming services/VOD. It’s easy to see that Mank, the latest film from David Fincher, the lauded director of The Social Network, Rooney Mara’s Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, etc.

Review: Let Them All Talk (2020)

I was interested in seeing Steven Soderbergh’s latest, Let Them All Talk, and not just because it features three legendary actresses, but also because I’m a fan of some of Soderbergh’s previous work, such as Erin Brockovich. Also, I was curious to see how the cast handled the mostly-improvised script; screenwriter Deborah Eisenberg provided brief outlines and biographies for the actors, in addition to a few scripted scenes.

Review: Wolfwalkers (2020)

I knew very little about the Ireland-set animated film Wolfwalkers prior to viewing it; I’d heard great reviews, with some people even saying that this film is better than Pixar’s latest, Soul, and could potentially beat it for the Best Animated Feature Film Oscar this year. And, while I found Wolfwalkers to be highly entertaining, heartwarming, and inventive, I’m not sure it has enough originality to surpass Soul.