Review: Sophie’s Choice (1982)

Sophie’s Choice is primarily known for Meryl Streep’s Oscar-winning performance, deemed by many to be one of the best performances by any actor (male or female) of all time. I believed critics and viewers, but I was skeptical that it could top who I’d currently ranked as my #1 Best Actress Oscar winner of all time (that I’d seen): Charlize Theron in Monster. I was wrong, and after finishing Sophie’s Choice, I immediately knew that I’d just witnessed one of the best acting performances of all time.

Review: The Godfather (1972)

How do you review a film that has already been discussed and raved about since its release (in this case, nearly 50 years ago)? As you may have noticed from my recent posts, I’ve been attempting to catch up on Oscar winners of the past, especially on those that were released way before I was born. I can’t really consider myself a movie snob until I’ve caught up on those movies, and I’m glad I’m finally checking classics like The Godfather off my seemingly never-ending list.

Review: First Wives Club (1996)

First Wives Club is the kind of film that lifts your spirits and is good to watch in between viewing dramatic, heavy movies. Sometimes, you just need to to watch a trio of A-list actresses engage in hilarious, ridiculous shenanigans, even if the execution isn’t perfect. 

Review: A Fantastic Woman (2017)

A Fantastic Woman is not the perfect film that people have made it out to be, but considering that it is the first Oscar-winning foreign/international film featuring a transgender character — whose star, Daniela Vega, became the first transgender presenter in Oscars history — its impact is impressive.

Review: Fargo (1996)

Fargo is, in a way, a difficult film to review because it’s so bizarrely unique and sometimes difficult to watch that I’m not sure I’ll ever be able to watch it again. That’s not to say that I didn’t find the movie entertaining and funny, but it is also uncomfortable and jarring at times — what we have come to know as a typical Coen brothers film

Review: The English Patient (1996)

The English Patient is the kind of romantic, sweeping epic that, were it made by or starring anyone less talented than those involved in the film, would’ve come across as overly cliche and laughable, even when it’s not supposed to be funny. Fortunately, this multiple Oscar winner is excellently done, and can be considered to be deserving of its numerous awards.

Review: Julia (1977)

Julia is a movie about which I knew very little, aside from the fact that it had won Oscars — and, being that I’m a movie snob who wants/needs to see as many Oscar-winning (and nominated) films as possible, this was on my seemingly never-ending queue. Also, I’d seen very little of Jane Fonda’s earlier, more dramatic work, and had only seen her in things like Grace and Frankie (a few episodes here and there) and the disappointing Book Club.  

Review: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is, in many ways, a unique film — and not just because it’s only one of three films (the others being It Happened One Night and The Silence of the Lambs) to receive the top 5 Oscar wins: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, and Adapted Screenplay. Not an easy feat, to be sure.

Review: The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999)

I came across this Oscar-nominated film while browsing Netflix for something intriguing, thriller-like to watch while self-quarantining at home. If you’ve seen some of my other reviews, you’ve probably noticed that I’ve been drawn to horror and similar films, perhaps just because I’ve been in the mood and have a newfound appreciation for them. While Anthony Minghella’s star-studded film is more of a mystery/thriller than a horror film, it contains some horrifying and creepy elements that are often found in horror genre flicks.

Review: Misery (1990) *SPOILERS*

Misery is essentially the first movie I watched during my self-quarantine, and one that is basically perfect viewing for being trapped in your home (unless you’re too freaked out by what transpires in the film). I’d been wanting to catch up on Oscar-winning performances that I missed, including this one that features Kathy Bates in her Best Actress-winning role as the kooky, villainous Annie Wilkes.