Review: Julia (1977)

Julia is a movie about which I knew very little, aside from the fact that it had won Oscars — and, being that I’m a movie snob who wants/needs to see as many Oscar-winning (and nominated) films as possible, this was on my seemingly never-ending queue. Also, I’d seen very little of Jane Fonda’s earlier, more dramatic work, and had only seen her in things like Grace and Frankie (a few episodes here and there) and the disappointing Book Club.  

Review: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is, in many ways, a unique film — and not just because it’s only one of three films (the others being It Happened One Night and The Silence of the Lambs) to receive the top 5 Oscar wins: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, and Adapted Screenplay. Not an easy feat, to be sure.

Review: Project Power (2020)

Project Power is the sort of movie that needs to be seen in theaters, but seeing as nearly all theaters were closed when it was released, it made sense to do so through Netflix. Although, to be fair, despite the film’s expensive special effects and high-watt stars like Jamie Foxx and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, the quality might not have been high enough to warrant a theatrical release.  

Review: The Personal History of David Copperfield (2020)

The Personal History of David Copperfield is probably unlike any other period piece you’ve seen before. For one, there’s color-blind casting, which could cause serious eyerolls from racists and other folks who may claim to be non-racist but prefer more “traditional” (i.e. white) casting in order for the stories to be more historically accurate. But, I believe all-white casting to be boring and not with the times.

Review: Da 5 Bloods (2020)

Da 5 Bloods was a surprise [to me] Spike Lee release. In fact, I hadn’t heard anything about it until it was released on Netflix over the summer, and knew very little until Chadwick Boseman passed away and everyone was talking about his role in the film. Unfortunately, Lee’s latest — released solely on the streaming service and now featuring Boseman’s image on the poster — is mainly a disappointment.