Review: Project Power (2020)

Project Power is the sort of movie that needs to be seen in theaters, but seeing as nearly all theaters were closed when it was released, it made sense to do so through Netflix. Although, to be fair, despite the film’s expensive special effects and high-watt stars like Jamie Foxx and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, the quality might not have been high enough to warrant a theatrical release.  

Review: The Personal History of David Copperfield (2020)

The Personal History of David Copperfield is probably unlike any other period piece you’ve seen before. For one, there’s color-blind casting, which could cause serious eyerolls from racists and other folks who may claim to be non-racist but prefer more “traditional” (i.e. white) casting in order for the stories to be more historically accurate. But, I believe all-white casting to be boring and not with the times.

Review: Da 5 Bloods (2020)

Da 5 Bloods was a surprise [to me] Spike Lee release. In fact, I hadn’t heard anything about it until it was released on Netflix over the summer, and knew very little until Chadwick Boseman passed away and everyone was talking about his role in the film. Unfortunately, Lee’s latest — released solely on the streaming service and now featuring Boseman’s image on the poster — is mainly a disappointment.

Review: Tenet (2020)

Tenet is a very difficult movie to review, perhaps because it’s so darn confusing. It’s the kind of film, like writer/director Christopher Nolan’s previous ones, needs to be viewed multiple times in order to at least have a basic grasp of what is transpiring. His latest, which was the first film I saw in theaters after Regal Cinemas [temporarily] reopened, is his most confounding one yet — in fact, the only one who is 100% sure of what is going on is, more than likely, Nolan himself.

Review: Always Be My Maybe (2019)

Always Be My Maybe may, in some respects, be considered a standard romantic comedy — especially with its numerous predictable elements and stereotypically terrible significant others — but it finds enough ways to keep the genre fresh and interesting without seeming to cater to anyone in particular.